Posts Tagged social network

Honey, You Didn’t Build That: How to Destroy Individualism in Your Children (and Society)

Although a bit cheesy and overacted—intentionally, to be sure—this latest satire on Obama’s “you didn’t build that” line is actually quite effective (HT).

Watch the video here:



It’s effective, I think, because it shows how the underlying truth of Obama’s more basic claim — that we don’t create things all by ourselves and we all rely on various relationships and social institutions — isn’t enough to save Obama’s remarks from themselves.

Surely, everything these parents say to their daughter is true. Without the trees, the popsicle-stick manufacturer, and her local school, this girl wouldn’t have had the opportunity to build what she build. This is, after all, a basic market/cooperation argument if you take out all of the manipulative government activity sleeping in Obama’s assumptions. The problem is: What this girl accomplished was worth celebrating, and it was neither the time nor place to start slandering and belittling her success—that is, unless these parents truly believed that what she did wasn’t really all that profound.

In closing, the Dad says: “It’s important to destroy their sense of individualism while they’re still young.” And this gets at the deeper root of why Obama said what he did: he has a bigger faith in top-down, collective action than bottom-up individual empowerment (I’ve discussed this previously). The individualism of all human persons Read the rest of this entry »

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#ActonU: The Week in Tweets

As already notedActon Institute, Grand Rapids, MI, I spent the bulk of last week attending Acton University, an event I would highly recommend to anyone interested in the intersection of economics and religion. Although I will likely blog at length about some of the sessions I attended (or at least the topics discussed therein), I figured I’d dump my Twitter “notes” on the blog in the meantime. (The event was discussed at #ActonU.)

My apologies in advance for any abbreviations, misspellings, unnecessary exclamation points or other frivolous and/or undesirable elements of the Twitterverse. You can follow the blog on Twitter here or follow my personal Twitter feed here.

Tuesday, June 14

Evening Program: Kick-off — Rev. Robert Sirico

  • Autonomy is important, lest we become the communist man – a mere blur in society. -Sirico
  • Christianity amplifies, clarifies, & outlines the implications of the individual and the other. -Sirico
  • The human person is the most sacred thing that presents itself to our senses other than God himself. -Sirico
  • The believers at Antioch were moved, whether they knew it or not, by their view of human dignity. -Sirico
  • The question of the human person is at the center of economics, culture and family. -Rev. Sirico
  • RT @mikejmill Acton University started tonight. Biggest year ever. 625 participants from 70 countries…plus 40 faculty.

Wednesday, June 15

Christian Anthropology — Samuel Gregg

  • “Power corrupts, but PowerPoint corrupts even more.” -Samuel Gregg
  • The Christian view of reason is much “richer” than the secularist’s. -Gregg
  • If reason is merely instrumental, there can be no real basis for freedom or basic rights. -Gregg
  • Our genes and environment may influence our actions, but they do not determine our *choices* -Gregg
  • “Freedom is much more than choosing; it’s choosing to live in the truth.” -Gregg
  • Dominion is not an excuse to be destructive and stewardship is not a call to be passive. -Gregg
  • Reading Marx is like reading an Old Testament prophet who replaces the Messianic message with mere secularist ideology. -Gregg

Frederic Bastiat: Christian and Apostle of the Market — Todd Flanders

  • Bastiat anticipated Catholic Social Teaching on socialism by half a century. -Todd Flanders
  • RT @EricTeetsel The difference between a good economist & a bad one is simple: a good economist sees the present & what must be foreseen …
  • “Destruction is not profitable.” -Bastiat #yathink?
  • Standing armies may be necessary but let’s not pretend they are not an economic advantage. -Bastiat paraphrased by Flanders
  • Destroying value for the sake of creating work is akin to shunning the most basic of divine providence. -Flanders
  • Bastiat at the point of death: “I see, I know, I believe; I am a Christian.”
  • Some guy just compared Charles I’s scaffold speech with Bastiat’s view of the law and voter enfranchisement. Awesome.

Ayn Rand and Christianity — Rev. Robert Sirico

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The Last Agora: Social Networks, Social Planners, and True Community

social network, Facebook, ZuckerbergMark Zuckerberg was recently named Time magazine’s “Person of the Year,” and regardless of whether you agree with the selection (or care!), Michael Knox Beran uses the occasion for some reflection on social networks and the concept of community.

Beran, who is one of my favorite writers on all things agora (see here), begins his commentary with the following quote from the Time piece:

[The] bigger social networks get, the more pressure there is on everybody else to join them…It’s going to get harder and harder to say no to Facebook and to the authentically wonderful things it brings, and the authentically awful things too.

Beran notes that “electronic community has its virtues,” but he laments modern society’s “morbid craving for it.” This craving, Beran argues, “reveals the degree to which actual community has collapsed in much of the West.”

But before you jump on the anti-corporation bandwagon and ridicule Zuckerberg for destroying authentic community, understand that Beran sees this more as a reflection of culture than the cause of its corrosion:

Social planners have gradually eviscerated the agora sanctuaries which once brought people together in face-to-face community: they have replaced the rich artistic culture of the old market square with Le Corbusier–style functionality; they have marginalized its spiritual traditions; they have supplanted its charitable institutions with dehumanizing social bureaucracies; and they have made its schools, the transmitters of its ancient civic culture, ever more morally and culturally vacuous.

In other words, Beran believes that social networks are (unfortunately) the last popular form of community we have. On the whole, we have tried to automate and mechanize virtue by tinkering with the social landscape. (This, of course, is why I had to put the “True” before “Community.”)

Such a reality, Beran argues, mirrors the outcome that Read the rest of this entry »

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