Posts Tagged Law

The Sin Police: Can the State Redeem You?

If you haven’t heard yet, Republican candidate Rand Paul made some controversial remarks about the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Paul’s basic argument was that we should prohibit racial discrimination by the government, but we should not intrude on the right of private businesses to practice bigotry.

The media firestorm over Paul’s comments seems to have subsided (for now), but the massive reaction affirms how many people believe it is the role of the State to be the sin police.

Pastor and theologian Douglas Wilson was recently asked to comment on the controversy, and his response brings up many issues worth thinking about.

Watch the video of his response here:

Wilson begins by saying the reaction and hype was spawned by a root problem in our society:

The problem that plagues us in our political discourse is that we don’t understand the difference between sins and crimes.

What Wilson means is that we always rush to pass laws to prohibit things we don’t approve of.  For Wilson, this common perspective comes from a misplaced worship Read the rest of this entry »

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The Second Greatest Commandment: Love Your Neighbor as Yourself

Jesus and the Pharisees by Jacob Jordaens (1593-1678)

Was the charity of the Pharisees aligned to a love for God?

We often repeat the notion that faith without works is dead. What we talk less about is how any corresponding works must retain focus of what is primary and essential to God.

After all, the greatest commandment God gives us has nothing to do with our neighbors in and by itself.

The Pharisees once asked Jesus this: “Which is the greatest commandment in the Law?”

Jesus answered with this: “‘You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind.’ This is the great and foremost commandment. The second is like it, ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’”

Let’s take a moment to focus on the second part of Jesus’ answer: “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”

Many see this is as just another spin on the Golden Rule, and thus we take Jesus’ answer too lightly — as a mere Sunday-school refrain, as a memory verse, or as a recycled proverb that is far too obvious to require any additional thought.

Others, however, take pains to misconstrue it.

These distortions take a variety of forms, a sample of which includes the following:

  1. We should love our neighbors instead of ourselves.
  2. We should love our neighbors more (or less) than ourselves.
  3. We should love ourselves first and then we will know how to love our neighbors properly.

But Jesus isn’t telling us any of these things. He’s simply telling us to love our neighbors in the same way we love ourselves. He isn’t provoking an argument about whether or how much as much as he is indicating that self-love is a core component of Read the rest of this entry »

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