Posts Tagged Kelly Kapic

Books I Read in 2011

The books I read in 2011 are listed below (alphabetically by author).

I didn’t read as much as I would’ve liked in 2011, and I also didn’t write about what I read as much as I would’ve liked. I hope to provide more reviews and “nuggets” from these books in the upcoming year, as many were impactful in the development of ideas discussed on this blog.

Here were some of my favorites:

  • The Victory of Reason – Rodney Stark
  • For God So Loved, He Gave – Kelly Kapic & Justin Borger
  • The White Man’s Burden – William Easterly
  • Living in God’s Two KingdomsDavid VanDrunen (enjoyment does not equal agreement!)
  • Money, Greed, and God – Jay Richards
  • The Holy Spirit in Mission – Gary Tyra

What did you read? What were your favorites?

Earthen Vessels: Why Our Bodies Matter to Our Faith – Matthew Lee AndersonLove Wins: A Book About Heaven, Hell, and the Fate of Every Person Who Ever Lived – Rob BellThe Power of Gold: The History of an Obsession – Peter L. BernsteinThe Law – Frédéric Bastiat

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black and Tired: Essays on Race, Politics, Culture, and International Development – Anthony B. Bradley

Decision Points – George W. BushSelfish Reasons to Have More Kids: Why Being a Great Parent is Less Work and More Fun Than You Think – Bryan CaplanMao: The Unknown Story – Jung Chang

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work: The Meaning Of Your Life – Lester DeKosterBringing Up Boys – James C. DobsonThe White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good – William EasterlyCapitalism and Freedom – Milton Friedman

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walt Disney: The Triumph of the American Imagination – Neal GablerTribes: We Need You to Lead Us – Seth GodenThe Road to Serfdom – Friedrich A. von HayekMere Environmentalism: A Biblical Perspective on Humans and the Natural World – Steven F. Hayward

 

 

 

 

 

 

God So Loved, He Gave: Entering the Movement of Divine Generosity – Kelly M. KapicThe Missional Mom: Living with Purpose at Home and in the World – Helen LeeDefending Constantine: The Twilight of an Empire and the Dawn of Christendom – Peter J. LeithartThe Prince and Other Works – Niccolo Machiavelli

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Blessed Life – Robert MorrisThink: The Life of the Mind and the Love of God – John PiperMoney, Greed, and God: Why Capitalism Is the Solution and Not the Problem – Jay W. RichardsThe Rational Optimist: How Prosperity Evolves – Matt Ridley

 

 

 

 

 

 

Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error – Kathryn SchulzThe Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression – Amity ShlaesIntellectuals and Society – Thomas SowellThe Victory of Reason: How Christianity Led to Freedom, Capitalism, and Western Success – Rodney Stark 

 

 

 

 

 

The Holy Spirit in Mission: Prophetic Speech and Action in Christian Witness – Gary TyraBourbon for Breakfast: Living Outside the Statist Quo – Jeffrey TuckerLiving in God’s Two Kingdoms: A Biblical Vision for Christianity and Culture – David VanDrunenSimply Christian: Why Christianity Makes Sense – N.T. Wright

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Chosen Instruments: Obedience and Socio-Economic Decision Making

Ananias restoring the sight of Saint Paul, Pietro De Cortana, 1631I have received a bit of criticism for my constant claim that obedience is the defining factor of the Christian life (e.g.), with most of critiques rooted in the belief that we are to instead focus on “sacrifice” or “love” (as if obedience to God would not involve either).

My questions are most simply: (1) love according to whom and (2) sacrifice for what?

I recently wrote about this very thing, emphasizing the need to follow the Holy Spirit in all that we do (hint: that’s why he’s here).

To further solidify this point, I wanted to take a moment to look at the Apostle Paul — a man who understood that “following the way of love” was interconnected with “eagerly desiring the gifts of the Spirit” (i.e. learning to hear his voice, discern it, and do what it says). As I have also previously noted, such an approach is extremely difficult because there is no hard-and-fast, legalistic solution. The Christian life is not a one-stop, altar-call sort of thing.

Paul had a good grasp of this, and made clear in his letter to the Philippians. Following a summary of his personal trials, Paul provides encouragement to the believers by honing in on the value that obedience will yield while also reminding them of the tensions it implies for their work here on this earth:

Yes, and I will rejoice, for I know that through your prayers and the help of the Spirit of Jesus Christ this will turn out for my deliverance, as it is my eager expectation and hope that I will not be at all ashamed, but that with full courage now as always Christ will be honored in my body, whether by life or by death. For to me to live is Christ, and to die is gain. If I am to live in the flesh, that means fruitful labor for me. Yet which I shall choose I cannot tell. I am hard pressed between the two. My desire is to depart and be with Christ, for that is far better. But to remain in the flesh is more necessary on your account. Convinced of this, I know that I will remain and continue with you all, for your progress and joy in the faith, so that in me you may have ample cause to glory in Christ Jesus, because of my coming to you again.

We all know what this means for our post-earth destination (or, I hope we do), but what does this mean for our own personal callings and struggles today? What does this mean for our socio-economic engagement with others?

First, it is clear that Paul has a purpose and that purpose is not his own. He did not endure imprisonments and beatings for nothing, yet he also did not endure them for personal glory or some lofty martyrdom status. Paul was not standing in the streets and blocking traffic for the mere purpose of being hauled away and lauded in the annals of do-gooder history. Paul was not offering himself as a firstborn calf on some altar of cultural symbolism or earthly greatness.

Paul was arrested for speaking the truth and doing what God told him to do. He was not seeking suffering as an ideal for himself (or anyone else). He was seeking the Glory of God to the point of suffering.

Likewise, Paul’s impetus did not come from some fleeting passion for “social justice.” Paul did not discover his life’s purpose from reading Barbara Ehrenreich in undergraduate school and getting worked up about class divisions and money-grubbing sinners. His purpose came from Read the rest of this entry »

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Divine Generosity: Making “Good Intentions” Good

God So Loved, He Gave, Divine Generosity, Kelly Kapic, Justin BorgerI have previously written on the importance of the Holy Spirit in aligning our lives to God’s perfect will and have also noted the limits of a spiritually dead worldview as it relates to generosity. What I haven’t done, however, is examined what will emerge — and how it will emerge — if we get all of our ducks in a row.

What might it look like if we were to actually succeed in avoiding the desires of the flesh, producing the fruits of the Spirit, and leveraging the subsequent alignment toward reaching the Lost, healing the sick, and helping the needy? What might it look like if our actions were guided by the Love of God rather than the Love of Man?

My friend Robby Moeller recently wrote eloquently about having a “head for the poor,” but while this is an important point, I am also concerned that our hearts might be further off than we think (hint: we’re sinners). Like anyone else, Christians are prone to what the Apostle Paul calls “futile thinking” and “foolish hearts.” We are constantly struggling to overcome a debased, idolatry-prone worldview.

In short, I fear that we often give our “good intentions” the benefit of the doubt.

What is “good” in the first place, and according to whom? Does it have anything to do with truth, and if so, how does that impact our view of love? What does “effective” mean under such a framework, or what about “compassion”? Are there any intentions worth esteeming if they fail to orient themselves correctly?

We need to correct our brains, yes, but more fundamentally, we need a spiritual revival that aligns our hearts and minds accordingly. This will certainly impact our perspectives on loftier political and philosophical levels, but more importantly, it will transform the way we approach our most mundane of day-to-day tasks and choices. Unbeknownst to many, God actually speaks, and we have the amazing opportunity to listen. Sound “radical” yet?

As Kelly Kapic argues in his recent book, God So Loved, He Gave, we have been called into a movement of divine generosity — one in which we reject bondage of this world and embrace God’s absolute ownership over our lives. “When captured by the depths of God’s gifts in the gospel,” Kapic states, “we discover that he frees us to participate in his work of grace, hope, righteousness, and love. This is the generous life: this is what belonging to God is all about.”

Sin is all around us, and although we are typically good at talking about it in church (or at least we used to be), we seem to forget that it’s a constant competing force in our fundamental decisionmaking. “No human relationship is free from this corrosive power,” as Kapic states, yet in our attempts to build relationships and community we seem to think that “good intentions” are all Read the rest of this entry »

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