Posts Tagged Justin Taylor

The Judges of Judgmentalism: Discerning Truth vs. People

The thesis of Rob Bell's forthcoming book ignited a theological firestorm.

There has been quite a bit of hullabaloo over Rob Bell’s upcoming book, Love Wins: A Book About Heaven, Hell, and the Fate of Every Person Who Ever Lived. The book’s thesis, according to the publisher’s description, argues that “a loving God would never sentence human souls to eternal suffering.”

Since the book is indeed an upcoming title, the chatter has largely focused around its marketing materials, particularly a promotional video in which Bell does what Bell does best: talks like a universalist. (emphasis on “talks like”)

After perusing the available materials, as well as some advance chapters, Gospel Coalition blogger Justin Taylor concluded that Bell may indeed be a universalist, after which John Piper chimed in with a simple, “Farewell Rob Bell. These remarks spurred retorts from across the Web, resulting in a cacophony of Bell-centered banter.

Oddly enough, many of those who have been defending Bell seem to care little about the actual validity of his views and beliefs, which, although relatively vague, make some startling absolute statements about the nature of God’s love. Instead of arguing over whether Bell’s views do indeed mesh with true Christianity (and/or oppose universalism), many of his followers have backed away from matters of theology altogether — grounding their defenses in verses like “judge not lest ye be judged.”

The message seems clear: Bell’s beliefs should not be up for scrutiny because criticism is not the Christian thing to do.

This brings us to some larger questions about the role of judgment itself, particularly when it comes to Christians. Since there is already plenty of healthy debate over the contents of Bell’s book, it is here that I would like to focus our discussion.

How are we to respond to others when we disagree with them? More specifically, how are we to respond to Christians when we think they depart from the Read the rest of this entry »

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Jesus Paid Taxes: Mark Dever on Rendering to Caesar

Mark Dever, senior pastor of Capitol Hill Baptist ChurchMark Dever recently gave a sermon at his church in Washington D.C. called “Jesus Paid Taxes,” in which he promotes what he believes to be the proper Christian approach to politics. I came across the sermon from Justin Taylor, who came across it from Collin Hansen.

Hansen provides some great notes on the sermon and even goes so far as to call it “the best sermon I know on Christianity and government.” I probably wouldn’t go that far, but it is indeed quite good. I listened to the sermon in full and found very little to disagree with.

Dever bases the discussion on Mark 12:13-17 (“Render to Caesar!”), and although his approach leaves quite a bit up to interpretation, I think his outlook would translate pretty well in application. His main points are as follows:

  1. Good Christians are good citizens (law-abiding, tax-paying, etc.)
  2. Christianity is international (spiritual ties transcend national ties)
  3. Christians are ultimately accountable to God (“Our duty to earthly authority is limited.”)

You can listen to the sermon here:

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I don’t have anything to add, but I thought I’d post some highlights for those who aren’t up for listening to the whole thing.

One of Dever’s most fundamental points has to do with authority — how it is Read the rest of this entry »

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