Posts Tagged David VanDrunen

Is “Christian Libertarian” an Oxymoron?

I don’t think the answer is necessarily “yes,” but I have some serious reservations with many prominent attempts to synthesize the two.

Joe Carter contemplates the question at the Acton Institute in response to this post by friend-of-the-blog and co-blogger at Values & Capitalism, Jacqueline Otto (though hers is actually a different response to yet another Carter post). The back-and-forth is well worth reading in full.

I certainly don’t consider myself a “libertarian,” but in my early deep-dive into politics I was actually quite close to crossing over. I still find myself swimming in many libertarian ponds, and I actually enjoy doing so (most of the time). What else is an economics-loving conservative to do?

Indeed, given my many inclinations toward libertarianism in the economics realm, and even some in the social (e.g. drug laws), some of my many (many, many) Christian libertarian readers might have even assumed that this blog was itself an attempt to reconcile the two. Fooled ya!

Anywho, Carter breaks his discussion down into five distinct types of Christian libertarians:

  • Type #1: Those who have developed a consistent philosophy in which libertarianism and Christianity are fully compatible.
  • Type #2: Those who mash the two words together.
  • Type #3: Those for whom the “Christian” in Christian libertarian is a weak modifier
  • Type #4: Christians who are really conservatives, but don’t like the label conservative
  • Type #5: Those who are Not-all-that-Christian and/or Not-all-that-Libertarian

I responded to his post with some initial “informal” reactions (not around any particular theme), so I thought I’d repost them here (albeit with some minor edits for this environment). Again, these are responses to the back-and-forth, so I encourage you to start by reading Carter’s post. Given that many of my favorite readers are self-described Christian libertarians, I’m interested in hearing your thoughts and critiques about Carter’s post, my reactions, or all of the above. 

1. The libertarian movement is diverse.

And this is the case with the movement Type #1s. One of the challenges in such a discussion is that there are many different types of libertarians. This is, I think, largely due to that whole Internet popularization thing Carter speaks to. You’ve got the folks who like Milton Friedman, and then you’ve got those who think he is the devil because he semi-collaborated with Reagan and the Republicans and was, um, kinda sorta practical and effective. Likewise, you’ve got the folks who love Hayek (who detest Friedman), and then you’ve got those who think Hayek was Read the rest of this entry »

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Books I Read in 2011

The books I read in 2011 are listed below (alphabetically by author).

I didn’t read as much as I would’ve liked in 2011, and I also didn’t write about what I read as much as I would’ve liked. I hope to provide more reviews and “nuggets” from these books in the upcoming year, as many were impactful in the development of ideas discussed on this blog.

Here were some of my favorites:

  • The Victory of Reason – Rodney Stark
  • For God So Loved, He Gave – Kelly Kapic & Justin Borger
  • The White Man’s Burden – William Easterly
  • Living in God’s Two KingdomsDavid VanDrunen (enjoyment does not equal agreement!)
  • Money, Greed, and God – Jay Richards
  • The Holy Spirit in Mission – Gary Tyra

What did you read? What were your favorites?

Earthen Vessels: Why Our Bodies Matter to Our Faith – Matthew Lee AndersonLove Wins: A Book About Heaven, Hell, and the Fate of Every Person Who Ever Lived – Rob BellThe Power of Gold: The History of an Obsession – Peter L. BernsteinThe Law – Frédéric Bastiat

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black and Tired: Essays on Race, Politics, Culture, and International Development – Anthony B. Bradley

Decision Points – George W. BushSelfish Reasons to Have More Kids: Why Being a Great Parent is Less Work and More Fun Than You Think – Bryan CaplanMao: The Unknown Story – Jung Chang

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work: The Meaning Of Your Life – Lester DeKosterBringing Up Boys – James C. DobsonThe White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good – William EasterlyCapitalism and Freedom – Milton Friedman

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walt Disney: The Triumph of the American Imagination – Neal GablerTribes: We Need You to Lead Us – Seth GodenThe Road to Serfdom – Friedrich A. von HayekMere Environmentalism: A Biblical Perspective on Humans and the Natural World – Steven F. Hayward

 

 

 

 

 

 

God So Loved, He Gave: Entering the Movement of Divine Generosity – Kelly M. KapicThe Missional Mom: Living with Purpose at Home and in the World – Helen LeeDefending Constantine: The Twilight of an Empire and the Dawn of Christendom – Peter J. LeithartThe Prince and Other Works – Niccolo Machiavelli

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Blessed Life – Robert MorrisThink: The Life of the Mind and the Love of God – John PiperMoney, Greed, and God: Why Capitalism Is the Solution and Not the Problem – Jay W. RichardsThe Rational Optimist: How Prosperity Evolves – Matt Ridley

 

 

 

 

 

 

Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error – Kathryn SchulzThe Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression – Amity ShlaesIntellectuals and Society – Thomas SowellThe Victory of Reason: How Christianity Led to Freedom, Capitalism, and Western Success – Rodney Stark 

 

 

 

 

 

The Holy Spirit in Mission: Prophetic Speech and Action in Christian Witness – Gary TyraBourbon for Breakfast: Living Outside the Statist Quo – Jeffrey TuckerLiving in God’s Two Kingdoms: A Biblical Vision for Christianity and Culture – David VanDrunenSimply Christian: Why Christianity Makes Sense – N.T. Wright

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Redemptive Road Trip: Church Is Not a Gas Station

As mentioned previously, I have been reading David VanDrunen’s Living in God’s Two Kingdoms and I am thoroughly enjoying it.

In the first part of the book, VanDrunen explains the story of the two kingdoms, starting with the first Adam, and ending with the last. In the second part, he explains how we as humans are to participate in both kingdoms, relying heavily on the term “sojourner” to characterize our role on this earth.

In the third and final part, VanDrunen discusses what he believes to be the overarching purpose for earthbound Christians: the church. If we are only sojourners on this earth, how are we to treat the church in the larger earthly context? (Or is the church the larger earthly context?) It is is this point that I want to explore for a bit.

VanDrunen begins by summarizing two popular analogies for going to church that I’m sure you’ve all heard:

One popular analogy is that going to church is like stopping at a gas station. Church is a place where we stop to fill up our tanks after a tiring and stressful week and thus get recharged for the week ahead. Another analogy compares going to church to a huddle in a football game. Church is the gathering of all the team’s players so that they can regroup, encourage each other, and prepare for separating again and facing the opponent through the coming week.

VanDrunen quickly moves on to explain why he thinks such analogies are “radically insufficient and misleading.” Here are the two primary deficiencies as VanDrunen sees them:

Deficiency #1: Church is not a human-centered event.

Perhaps most obviously, these analogies portray going to church as a human-centered event. Going to church is not primarily about me or even about Read the rest of this entry »

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Kingdom Economics: Transcending Scarcity

Living in God's Two Kingdoms, David VanDrunenI have been reading David VanDrunen’s Living in God’s Two Kingdoms, which I received as part of a promotion by Matthew Lee Anderson. Although I still have a ways to go, I recently read one little piece about kingdom economics that I found particularly interesting.

While writing about the church’s “distinctive ethic” of generosity, VanDrunen says the following:

Anyone who has studied economics — the economics of the common kingdom — has learned the fundamental principle of scarcity. Though worldly wealth is not exactly a fixed quantity that creates a zero-sum game (there is much more worldly wealth now than there was a thousand years ago), there is truly only so much to go around. A certain sum of money will only satisfy a certain number of needs and desires. A piece of property cannot be enjoyed by everyone.

VanDrunen then comments on the personal benefits of generosity, on which I have recently commented (here, here, and here):

The explanation lies not in a complex theory worthy of a Nobel Prize economist, but in the mysterious, wonderful, economics-defying work of God. He “is able to make all grace abound to you, so that having all sufficiency in all things at all times, you may abound in every good work” (2 Cor. 9:8). When the impoverished give generously, God makes them “enriched” in the experience (9:11). In part, this is about money, but only in part.

Then, VanDrunen offers this high-level summary of kingdom economics:

In the church there are no winners and losers, but every act of love is mutually enriching in Christ’s economics — an economics built not on the principle of scarcity but on the principle of extravagant Read the rest of this entry »

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