Corresponding the Shape of Good Economics to the Shape of the Gospel


Shape of EconomicsOver at the Acton Institute PowerBlog, I piggy-back on a recent Michael Bull post to offer a reminder that we needn’t give all the credit to the market when we reap the benefits of market exchange, free trade and globalization.

For Christians in particular, we should view capitalism as a launching pad for spiritual and social transformation, not a mere means to materialistic ends:

Capitalism is, after all, a mere framework for human engagement. Although the constraints it imposes (“thou shalt not steal”) and the features it elevates (ownership, stewardship, risk, and sacrifice) may fit well within a broader Christian context, it says more about what we can and can’t do than what we might or might not imagine or accomplish…

… For the Christian, then, capitalism provides a simple baseline from which we can launch, holding the potential to lead us toward a broader, deeper network through which we can more freely and fully obey the callings of the Holy Spirit in our lives as we proclaim good news to the poor. In allowing for this free-flow of individual callings, we are given opportunities and choices that many other systems would assume on our behalf.

As Bull writes, we as Christians are called to reach beyond the bare minimum—a truth I’ve emphasized routinely here on the blog:

The final step of Covenant is that you, the risk taker, become a shelter, a house, for the helpless. The final step is generosity. Capitalism only works in a moral society. This is why we can correspond the shape of good economics to the shape of the Gospel. Jesus gave His life to give abundant life to us all. He believed in the promise made to Him by the Father, the promise of resurrection—a new body. Poverty was not something to be embraced eternally. Christian socialists forget that Jesus now owns everything. All the great saints were rich people who risked their wealth for even greater wealth, a wealth that included a legacy of other people—a household. The “glory that was set before Him” was also the glory of the Church, a new body that includes every believer. Jesus Himself is our covering. We are only saved because of His atonement, His “covering.” He, the king of kings, the great Land Lord, is our shelter.

Read the full post here.

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  • http://twitter.com/remnantculture/status/279241759068921856 Remnant Culture

    Christians should view capitalism as a launching pad for spiritual transformation, not a means to materialistic ends. http://t.co/xM9HPcLy

  • http://twitter.com/gwashingtoninde/status/279243039225024512 JBWJR

    Christians should view capitalism as a launching pad for spiritual transformation, not a means to materialistic ends. http://t.co/xM9HPcLy

  • http://twitter.com/oncallinculture/status/279245580486729728 OnCallInCulture

    Christians should view capitalism as a launching pad for spiritual transformation, not a means to materialistic ends. http://t.co/xM9HPcLy

  • http://twitter.com/josephsunde/status/279276211719532544 Joseph Sunde

    Corresponding the Shape of Good Economics to the Shape of the Gospel http://t.co/C2gIUfj6 via @OnCallInCulture

  • http://twitter.com/rjmoeller/status/279278669950750721 RJ Moeller

    Corresponding the Shape of Good Economics to the Shape of the Gospel http://t.co/C2gIUfj6 via @OnCallInCulture

  • http://twitter.com/generousmind/status/279362216929656832 generousmind

    Corresponding the Shape of Good Economics to the Shape of the Gospel http://t.co/C2gIUfj6 via @OnCallInCulture

  • http://twitter.com/remnantculture/status/279606729262637056 Remnant Culture

    Corresponding the Shape of Good Economics to the Shape of the Gospel http://t.co/xM9HPcLy @OnCallInCulture @josephsunde

  • http://twitter.com/rjmoeller/status/279651493513154561 RJ Moeller

    Corresponding the Shape of Good Economics to the Shape of the Gospel http://t.co/xM9HPcLy @OnCallInCulture @josephsunde