Bono Abandons Babel?


U2 singerThere’s been a bit of buzz over Bono’s recent remarks about the positive role of markets in reducing global poverty and spurring economic development (HT):

The Irish singer and co-founder of ONE, a campaigning group that fights poverty and disease in Africa, said it had been “a humbling thing for me” to realize the importance of capitalism and entrepreneurialism in philanthropy, particularly as someone who “got into this as a righteous anger activist with all the cliches.”

“Job creators and innovators are just the key, and aid is just a bridge,” he told an audience of 200 leading technology entrepreneurs and investors at the F.ounders tech conference in Dublin. “We see it as startup money, investment in new countries. A humbling thing was to learn the role of commerce.”

I’m a bit skeptical about the broader significance of these remarks on Bono’s activism, but I do think they’re illuminating. Over at the Acton Institute, I argue that Bono’s new humbled attitude is precisely what we need in our attempts to improve economic development:

Although I’m not overly confident that Bono’s sudden self-awareness is enough to radically shift his aid efforts away from fostering dependency, this small admission helps illuminate one of our key obstacles to doing good in the world: overzealousness paired with overconfidence.

Bono describes his realization as a “humbling thing,” and “humbling” is precisely what the foreign aid experts and economic planners could use. As Friedrich Hayek famously wrote, “The curious task of economics is to demonstrate to men how little they really know about what they imagine they can design.” As the story of the Tower of Babel well confirms, man has a natural disposition to think he knows more than he knows and can construct beyond what he can construct—all to make a name for himself. The juice of righteous anger is a powerful enabler, and once it’s pumping through our veins it takes even less time for our human tendencies to escalate. After all, we’re only out to deliver humanity to heaven’s doorstep.

Such overconfidence in our own designs can be particularly destructive in the realm of economics, a science that’s in a constant battle over whether it should seek to explain human action, control it, or bypass it altogether. Such planners find a perfect match in eager activists such as Bono. “We can build your tower to heaven,” they’ll say, “and you can make a name for yourself. If only the right policy buttons are pushed and the right economic equilibrium is arranged, the world can be set to rights.”

Of all people, Christians should be aware of the deeper spiritual questions we should be asking, cautious not to be wise in our own eyes:

The economic engineer’s intrusion goes well beyond barging into more natural and effective social institutions. For in doing so, he treats dignified man and the unpredictable, invaluable relationships in which he engages as the mere mingling of predictable pieces in a larger static game. Such an intrusion should cause great alarm for those of us seeking restoration among the suffering. For how can we hope to improve conditions for the human person if we skip past what it means to be a human person? For the Christian in particular, God instructs each of us to do what the Lord wills. Are we really to assume that this means submitting the poor and rich alike to Millennium Development Goals, or should we instead focus on freeing all people to pursue what is good and true?

Read the rest here.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

  • http://twitter.com/remnantculture/status/263670687716241408 Remnant Culture

    Bono says he has a newfound appreciation for capitalism. Here's my thoughts on why it took him so long: http://t.co/7ePYoYUT

  • http://twitter.com/friedrichhayek/status/263675308484481025 TakingHayekSeriously

    Bono says he has a newfound appreciation for capitalism. Here's my thoughts on why it took him so long: http://t.co/7ePYoYUT

  • http://twitter.com/rmmauro01/status/263677780544339968 ron mauro

    Bono says he has a newfound appreciation for capitalism. Here's my thoughts on why it took him so long: http://t.co/7ePYoYUT

  • http://twitter.com/rjmoeller/status/263678406351278081 RJ Moeller

    Bono says he has a newfound appreciation for capitalism. Here's my thoughts on why it took him so long: http://t.co/7ePYoYUT

  • http://twitter.com/josephsunde/status/263683306472742912 Joseph Sunde

    Bono abandons Babel? http://t.co/CKQGIlE4 @mmathesonmiller @povertycure @ActonInstitute

  • http://twitter.com/5tots/status/263684353127743488 David Posey

    Bono says he has a newfound appreciation for capitalism. Here's my thoughts on why it took him so long: http://t.co/7ePYoYUT

  • http://twitter.com/ct1963/status/263685437216915456 Chris Trimm

    Bono says he has a newfound appreciation for capitalism. Here's my thoughts on why it took him so long: http://t.co/7ePYoYUT

  • http://twitter.com/crichton18/status/263692696818941952 Jeff Crichton

    Bono says he has a newfound appreciation for capitalism. Here's my thoughts on why it took him so long: http://t.co/7ePYoYUT

  • http://twitter.com/wilfredd/status/263693561701228545 wilfred v d kooij

    Yes Bono you are never to old to learn!
    http://t.co/KbgF8RXj

  • http://twitter.com/roninmac/status/263700624384860161 Matthew MacLeod

    Bono says he has a newfound appreciation for capitalism. Here's my thoughts on why it took him so long: http://t.co/7ePYoYUT

  • http://twitter.com/remnantculture/status/264071782938591232 Remnant Culture

    Bono says his realization about capitalism was a “humbling thing,” & humbling is precisely what aid experts could use: http://t.co/Ao3ntSkX

  • http://twitter.com/graber429/status/264073275360034816 Don Graber

    Bono says his realization about capitalism was a “humbling thing,” & humbling is precisely what aid experts could use: http://t.co/Ao3ntSkX