My Intellectual Journey: Legos, Puzzles, and Communism


Common Sense ConceptI will now be writing a weekly post at Common Sense Concept, which is a brand new site backed by the American Enterprise Institute. The site is part of AEI’s Project on American Values and Capitalism, which was the sponsor of the recent event I participated in on envy and economics.

CSC will focus on the promotion of morality and values in our policymaking, particularly as they relate to free enterprise.

The first major event will be a debate between Sojourners CEO Jim Wallis and AEI President Arthur Brooks at Wheaton College. The debate will center on the question, “Does Capitalism Have a Soul?” I myself am hoping to make it out to the event, and if you’re anywhere near the Wheaton/Chicago area, I encourage you to do so as well.

I will be writing on the site’s Two Cents Blog on Faith and Free Enterprise along with some extremely bright evangelical thinkers. I look forward to participating in the conversation and am excited to watch this effort continue to evolve.

My first post is already up on the blog, and it provides a glimpse into my intellectual journey from childhood to adulthood. I talk about LEGOs, puzzles, and most importantly, how horrifying communism sounded as a six-year-old.

Here’s an excerpt from the post:

Being the ignorant little kid I was, I asked my Mom if the U.S.S.R. was the biggest country in the world. She walked over to the puzzle, glanced at the back of the box, and informed me that as of a few months ago, the U.S.S.R. no longer existed.

For a six-year-old, that’s a bit hard to swallow. How can a country just disappear — especially when it’s the biggest one on the puzzle? What about the people who lived there? Did they decide to move somewhere else? Was the U.S.S.R. just a downright boring place to live?

Upon such prodding, my Mom offered a few more details. Unfortunately, despite her honorable attempt to give me the elementary-school version, the description was unavoidably horrific.

You can read the rest here.

In the future, I’ll do my best to cross-post excerpts of my CSC posts here at Remnant Culture. In the meantime, I encourage you to follow CSC for yourself, either on Facebook or Twitter.

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